Chives are part of a large genus of approximately 500 species of mostly strong-smelling perennials that contain bulbs or underground stems. These allium herbs include garlic, onions, scallions, leeks, and chives, and belong to the lily family. Various allium species have been cultivated since earliest times and are universally important as vegetables, flavorings, and medicinal plants.

These allium herbs were popular among the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. The strong odor, so typical of these herbs, is due to a variety of sulfur compounds, such as alkyl sulfoxides and allyl sulfides. They are reported to have beneficial effects on the circulatory, digestive and respiratory systems.

Chives Are Hardy

Chives are native to the cool regions of Europe and Asia. Now they grow wild in North America, especially around the Great Lakes region. They can even be found growing wild in your backyard lawn. Chives are a popular hardy garden plant that grows from 8 to 15 inches tall.

They have slender bulbs that grow in tightly crowded clumps. Chives can be propagated by dividing the clumps. They can grow with full sun or partial shade. Chives are winter hardy, drought tolerant, and can grow in almost any garden soil. Chives can also grow indoors during the winter in a container that is placed on or near the windowsill.

Chives are known to have several medical properties in the stems and flowers. They are similar to those of garlic, but weaker, hence the reason chive is not used for its medical purposes at a great extent.
  1. Step 1

    Control your high blood pressure with chives remedies. Chives are used for the control of high blood pressure and in improving the circulation of blood. The presence of organisulphide compounds such as alkyl sulfoxides and allyl sulphides in chives make the treatment of high blood pressure possible.

  2. Step 2

    Treat of stomach problems using chives. Chives are used to promote good digestion and to treat cases of indigestion. They can also ease stomach upsets and stimulate appetite. Traditionally, chives were eaten and used to treat and purge intestinal and stomach parasites.

  3. Step 3

    Use chives to prepare home-made insect repellent. Growing chives repel unwanted insect life, so the juices from the leaves can be used for repelling insects such as mosquitoes and aphids. They can also be used to fight fungal infections, mildew and scab.

  4. Step 4

    Alleviate pain using this herb. Chives are used to relieve pain caused by a sore throat. It has also been taken by people with a cold. Chives were used by the Romans to cure sunburns. It should however be taken in large amounts for the benefits to be seen.

  5. Step 5

    Increase your folic acid intake using chives. Chives are rich in folic acid and hence promote a healthy heart. They prevent the accumulation of homocysteine, an intermediary metabolite of protein metabolism, which promotes atherosclerosis by reducing the integrity of blood vessel walls and by interfering with the formation of collagen.

Chives In Cooking
Chives should be used fresh and uncooked, otherwise they loose almost all their flavour. When used with cooked foods, add them after cooking. They can be dried, but their is little point because they then have no flavour. One way to store them is to chop the leaves into 1cm (half inch) lengths and place them in ice cue containers with some water. Freeze them, and then defrost an ice cube or two when need to use them.

Chives can be used to add flavour to a huge range of food, probably best known for adding to baked potatoes with butter. Other uses foods it goes well with include mixed vegetables, egg dishes, salads and dressings, broiled poultry, stews, casseroles and baked fish.

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