Piper sarmentosum (Daun Kadok)
12:21 PM | Author: Atie


Piper sarmentosum is an erect herb with long creeping stems. The plant is usually found as a weed in villages and places with plenty of shade (Hsuan, 1990). Leaves alternate, simple, heart shaped and young leaves have a waxy surface. Flowers are bisexual or unisexual, in terminal or leaf opposite spikes. Fruit is small, dry, with several rounded bulges. Plant has a characteristic pungent odour (Wee, 1992; Wee and Hsuan, 1990; Hsuan, 1990; 1992).

Common names
Chinese: Jia ju; Malay: Sirih tanah (Indonesia), Chabei, Kadok; Thai: cha-phloo.

This plant, known as Daun Kadok in Malaysia, is often for its cousin Piper betel leaf plant. Daun Kadok is very popular and more widely used. It is a common plant used in traditional medicine and cooking (the subtly peppery taste of the heart-shaped and glossy leaves adds zest to omelets and other viands). A study conducted by the Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (FRIM) shows that extracts from Kadok leaves have anti-oxidant properties. Piper sarmentosum is often made into drink to relieve the symptoms of malaria. The roots could be chewed to stop toothaches. A portion made from its roots is said to be diuretic. The drink has also been known to be effective in treating coughs, flu, rheumatism, pleurosy and lumbago. Young leaves are taken as ulam (condiment).

According to the World Health Organization website, 80 percent of the population in some Asian and African countries count on herbal treatments for their primary health care.


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2 comments:

On March 17, 2012 at 12:10 PM , Anonymous said...

Greetings,
In Thailand this plant is known as "Bai Cha Plu" and is used as a wrap for a tasty snack know as "Miang Kum" ... containing small amounts of dried shrimp, peanuts, lemon, lemon grass, and galangal ... delicious and healthy!
It is also believed , when the leaved are boiled, that the drink helps reduce high blood pressure.
John

 
On May 28, 2014 at 9:05 AM , .aisyaMademoiselle. said...

A great and healthy 'companion' to be eaten together with rice :))

 
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